Monthly Archives: February 2013

Get a Jump on Gardening with Free Library Programs

Crocodiles enliven this shady "pond" in one whimsical Denver-area garden.

Crocodiles enliven this shady “pond” in one whimsical Denver-area garden.

If you’re eager to get a jump on the gardening season, you’re welcome to attend one of my talks at the Denver Public Library in March and April.  The programs, which are free and open to the public, include:

  • Add Whimsy to Your Garden for Next to NothingTimes and places: Wednesday, March 6, at 6pm at the Smiley branch; Saturday, April 13, at 1pm at the Ross-Cherry Creek branch; and Saturday, April 27, at 2pm at the Bear Valley branch.
  • How to Grow a Low-Sneeze, Breathe-Easy GardenTime and place: Saturday, March 30, at 2pm at the Ross-University Hills branch.
  • 12 Gorgeous Groundcovers for Preventing Weeds. Times and places: Wednesday, April 6, at 6pm at the Ross-Cherry Creek branch; and Sunday, April 14, at 2pm at the Schlessman Family branch.

For details and branch locations, pick up a Fresh City Life brochure at your Denver Public Library branch or visit denverlibrary.org/fresh/mybranch.  The programs run from 45 minutes to an hour.

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Filed under Shameless Plugs

It’s Time to Cut Back

These grasses may be beautiful, but they need to come down.  Now.

These grasses may be beautiful, but they need to come down. Now.

You’ve enjoyed several months of winter interest from your ornamental grasses, but it’s time to haul out the hedge clippers and/or chainsaw if you live in Colorado and it’s February.  It’s time to cut back.  It may be hard, but if your dead blades and seedheads are still standing when the green blades grow in, your grasses will look just plain weird.  And they won’t be as healthy as they could be.

So, how far should you cut them back?  To about six inches above ground.  You may not be able to cut that low with some of your larger grasses, but get them down to a foot or so if you can.  Cutting back is easier if you tie the grass blades together with a piece of twine.

Once the new growth comes in, it’ll hide the grass stumps.

Happy cutting.

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Filed under Garden Maintenance