Monthly Archives: June 2013

More Whimsy: Create Wind Chimes from Recycled Utensils

A recycled cookie cutter and flatware, combined with beads and a colander, make an inexpensive, charming wind chime.

A recycled cookie cutter and flatware, combined with beads and a colander, make an inexpensive, charming wind chime.

Add the soft tinkling of wind chimes to your garden by fashioning a chime from recycled cookie cutters and flatware.

For the top of mine, I used a mini colander.  But you can also use graters, teapots, metal soap dishes, metal lamp shades or other dome-like pieces.  Then use fishing line to string beads and tie hanging pieces to the colander.

The trickiest part is drilling holes in the ends of the flatware.  First, make a scratch on the back of the spoon or fork handle with a scribe tool.  This scratch will show you where to drill and help the drill bit get a grip on the metal instead of skating around.  Then, place the spoon or fork into a vise to hold it steady.  Next, drill a hole where you made the scratch.

Be sure to buy a drill bit that’s labeled for heavy metal and stainless steel.  I used a 1/16″ bit.

If you live in the Denver area, you can sign up for my free wind chime workshop July 11 at Denver Public Library’s Bear Valley branch.  To register, just call 720-865-0975 or email fclmybranch@denverlibrary.org.

Update: Workshop participants at the July 11 wind chime workshop display their finished products.

Update: Workshop participants at the July 11 wind chime workshop display their finished products.

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Filed under Landscape Design, Whimsy

Gardeners Craft Wacky Scarecrows

Workshop participants happily display their newly created scarecrows, designed to add whimsy to their gardens.

Workshop participants happily display their newly created scarecrows, designed to add whimsy to their gardens.

Denver-area gardeners created a plethora of scarecrows at my scarecrow-building workshop this month at Denver Public Library’s Schlessman branch.

You could tell the scarecrows were related because they all had red hair, burlap skin tone and maniacal looks on their faces.   One scarecrow sported a Harley Davidson logo on its bib overalls.  Another scarecrow displayed red-and-white guitars on his bib.  All were fun and loveable, as were their creators.

Denver Public Library generously paid for all materials for the workshop.

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Filed under Landscape Design, Whimsy